Category Archives: Technical tips and ideas

Teflon time-saver for your heat press

Teflon sheets.

A Teflon sheet on the lower platen of your heat press can make it a lot easier to slide garments on and off. The rubber-silicon pad on the lower platen doesn’t allow for easy sliding on and off of garments. The Teflon sheet will change that.

You’ll want a sheet bigger than your bottom platen so that it will overlap the edges. Magnets on the underside of the platen can be used to secure the sheet in place.

 

Have you discussed ink with your Stanley’s person lately?

These guys at Stanley’s know a lot about ink!

Ink manufacturers, Wilflex in particular, are constantly working on developing new inks and upgrading existing inks. Not only does it make business sense for them to do this, but they also have to make sure their products are compatible with the steady stream of new fabrics that regularly appear on the market and that they meet increasingly strict environmental standards. They also listen to printers’ demands such as the long-standing beef about having to carry so many whites for coping with different fabrics. On this particular topic, Wilflex now has an all-purpose white available. Have you tried it yet?

Give Stanley’s a call and ask to speak to a textile ink specialist about recent changes, upgrades and anything else you’d like to know about textile ink. Best locations to call about textile ink: Calgary (403 243 7722  ) and Cambridge (519 620 7342).

Chemicals = Gloves

Keep ink and chemicals off your skin.

A recent post on LinkedIn pointed out that 60 percent of liquids (including paste-like products) that come into contact with our skin are absorbed. Even if, like me, you’re not sure how to interpret this number exactly, the fact remains that our skin absorbs stuff. If you’ve ever used a hand cream you’ll know this.

So, why do so many screen printers expose their hands to inks and chemicals? If you don’t wear gloves, you’re absorbing stuff through your skin that’s not good for you, to say the least! It’s a serious matter. Gloves, re-usable and disposable, are cheap at the price when compared with the cost of health problems.

Reclaiming, degreasing, and “de-ghosting” in the sink; there are alternatives.

Where is this going?

As local authorities become increasingly sensitive about what goes down the drain and into the municipal water processing system, you may want to consider alternatives to your open-sink screen recovery process. Stanley’s can tell you about dip tanks, closed loop filtering systems, and holding tanks. Do this before you’re forced to or, worse still, incur a fine.

Water-based ink and emulsions

Water-based ink will destroy some regular emulsions!

If you’re fairly new to the textile screen printing industry, you might not yet realize that water-based inks are much more aggressive towards emulsion than plastisol inks are. Standard emulsion for plastisol printing mostly won’t cut it if you’re going to use water-based inks. Talk to Stanley’s about emulsions suitable for water-based printing.

Buying a dryer

Pick the right-sized dryer but make sure you have trade-in or trade-up options later.

What is one of your challenges in buying a new dryer? Outgrowing it. This is why you need to make sure that the manufacturer has a trade-in or trade-up program. With this assurance you’ll be relieved of the up-front challenge of guessing at future production demands and either over- or under-buying with no recourse.

The maintenance behind the great print

How’s your maintenance schedule?

 

Do you know that when you see a great prize-winning print, it’s just the tip of the iceberg? Below it and out of sight lies a secret—proper maintenance of: the press; the exposure unit; the ink mixer; the squeegees; the screen; the coating trough; and a dozen other items of tools and equipment. How good is the maintenance program in your shop?

Flash cure

So that’s why my prints are washing out!

Do you know that if you’re relying on your flash cure to cure your prints, you’re running the risk of improper curing? If you’re serious about putting out a great print, get the proper equipment. How would you feel about a surgeon taking out your appendix with a kitchen knife rather than a scalpel?

Plastisol

I didn’t know that!

Do you know that regardless of what some ink manufacturers say about being able to use their ink straight from the container, you should stir it every time before scooping into the screen? Plastisol gets a little “thicker” in the container over time — a good stir not only makes it easier to work with, but will let you know if you have to consider a thinner.

A tip for you

Use the ink designed for the fabric.

Use an ink designed for your substrate. Sound obvious? Perhaps, but printers still make this mistake every day. Polyester fabrics are prone to dye migration so use a dye-block ink designed for polyester. Some fabrics stretch, so use a stretch ink on them. Not sure what type of ink to use? Ask Stanley’s.

A tip for you

Think about your online strategy for 2018 and beyond.

Earlier this year a tip indicated that Generation Z (1996 and younger) will be 40% of all consumers by 2020 and 79 percent of them show symptoms of emotional stress when separated from their personal electronic devices. This is a reminder that as you approach the new year and think about future online marketing plans, you should be taking this into account.

A tip for you

Have you considered focussing on a particular customer type?

Continuing with the theme of finding and edge in the market, have you considered focussing on a specific industry or service with your printing? For instance, what about beauty salons? It’s a huge industry that uses uniforms, T-shirts, towels, and robes. Focus in business can be powerful.

A story with a message

Here’s Graham at Stanley’s Calgary branch a few days ago . . .

Keep it clean.

“We had a customer yesterday who desperately needed a repeat of a  gallon of red plastisol ink he’d had before. Usually this is no problem at all. As long as we have the Wilflex colour’s name or the 5-digit code, we can mix the exact match and have it ready in a few minutes. But in this case there was a problem.

He could no longer read the bucket label because of sloppy house-keeping procedures — it had been destroyed by first messing ink all over it and then probably trying to wipe it down with a solvent cleaner, who knows? Anyway, when this happens we have to try to identify which red it is from past records or try to colour match it by eye. This is time-consuming and sometimes difficult depending on the colour.

The lesson? In order to prevent contamination of colours and avoid ending up with buckets of mysterious, unnamed colours, remember that cleanliness is next to godliness when working with plastisol inks.”

Well said.

 

A tip for you

Select your Polyester ink carefully.

 

Polyester doesn’t just mean a single type of fabric anymore. There are different types of Polyesters on the market now. Light-weight inners, light and heavy-weight outer garments, single or multiple layers, weatherproof outerwear, suitable for sublimation, and so forth. These different Polyesters along with the usual Polyester bleeding issues, require the right ink. Select your Polyester ink carefully.

A tip for you

Don’t overdo the squeegee strokes.

 

 

 

If you have a manual press and you’re relatively new to textile screen printing, you may be struggling with the number of strokes of the squeegee you need to get a decent print. You don’t have to “work” the ink into the garment. One stroke should do it but if you need additional coverage you can do a second stroke but do it in the same direction of the first stroke.

A tip for you

You can’t print like this.

This is a particularly good tip if you’re new to screen printing. Keep ink off your hands while printing. Plastisol has a sneaky way of finding it’s way to where you don’t want it to be, particularly when you’re inexperienced. It finds its way onto container sides, lids, work surfaces, squeegee handles, frame edges, and then onto your hands. Once on your hands it’s only a matter of time until unwanted smudges begin to appear on your garments. So, be fanatical about cleanliness.

A tip for you

Don’t overdo the flashing!

 

Don’t become a flash cure addict. Almost anyone can get a good print by curing between each colour — it covers up issues like thick ink, poor artwork overlays, etc. But it slows production down. Overcome the flashing habit and speed up production with good artwork, the correct mesh, the right ink viscosity, and only the number of strokes needed (not too many). Only flash when absolutely necessary.

 

A tip for you

Always stir your ink before using it.

 

 

Plastisol gets a little thicker when it sits around in the container. You should be in the habit of always stirring ink before using it — you never know for sure how long it has been sitting idle. Another reason to always stir is that you’ll quickly establish if it needs a thinner before you scoop it into the screen. But be careful about adjusting white inks because additives can change their vital properties.

A tip for you

Use the right ink!

 

 

 

 

It shouldn’t be an issue anymore, but it is. Different plastisols are designed for different substrates. Make sure you have the right ink before you start a job and your prints on Polyester won’t bleed and those on Nylon won’t peel off (to name just a few perils of using the wrong ink).