Direct-to-garment update.

How do you like your DTG printer?

I’ve just run across a series of interviews conducted with DTG machine users in the U.K. late last year. Their responses provide an interesting update of this relatively new technology.

You will remember some of the knocks against DTG technology when it first started showing  its face at the trade shows a little over a decade ago. It was much slower than screen printing, the equipment was expensive, it couldn’t print on darks, the “furry” nature of T-shirts caused the print heads to clog up, the machines seemed to perform quite well in a show environment but when they had to work in a typical shop environment there were issues, it was not production friendly, and so forth.

There is no doubt that the technology has come a long way and, as is typical of new technology, even as the quality improves, the price declines. This is true of DTG but, it seems from the feedback from the users interviewed, some of the initial cautions still remain.

For instance, cleaning and maintenance is important. The heads can still clog up. They can also dry up if the machine in not used continuously. One respondent suggested that a DTG machine is like an aircraft — if it’s not working all the time it develops issues and can become a questionable investment. The prevailing opinion still seems to be that it is not production friendly and, as one person noted, if an order is for more than 100 prints, they revert to screen printing.

On the plus side, the issue of printing on darks has largely been solved and some respondents mentioned that they really  liked the detailed prints they could achieve.

This all seems more positive than it once was, but keep in mind that DTG still can’t do special effects.

So, would an investment in a DTG printer make sense for your shop? That depends of course on the nature of your shop and its workload. The same caution applies as much now as it did when the technology first hit the market — do your homework on the technology and the numbers.